Brown v. Topeka

http://www.oyez.org/cases/1950-1959/1952/1952_1/
http://www.nationalcenter.org/brown.html

The Brown decision provided a springboard for disability advocates to argue that if black students enjoyed a right to non-separate public education than their white children with disabilities should enjoy the same rights. The links above provide an overview for the context of the decision and the actual language of Warren's opinion. Be familiar with the language of the decision for possible bonus point questions.

Other course cases to consider include the PARC v. Pennsylvania and Mills v. Washington, D.C., decisions:
PARC v. Pennsylvania
http://www.faculty.piercelaw.edu/redfield/library/case-parc.pennsylvania.htm
Mills v. Washington, D.C.
http://www.faculty.piercelaw.edu/redfield/library/case-mills.boe.htm

Larry P. v. Riles
http://academics.hamilton.edu/government/dparis/govt375/spring97/Race&Testing/rt6.html

People First Language

The concept of People First Language is important in Disability Policy and Special Education. The following paper, written by Kathie Snow articulates the importance of this concept.


Harrison Bergeron

Harrison Bergeron is a short story written by the author Kurt Vonnegut in 1961. The battle for civil rights for those with disabilities was just getting starting and Vonnegut offers a different solution for supporting those with disabilities in our culture. While his suggestions seem absurd, we find truths that apply to current legislation in the field of education.


Child's Play by Alice Munro

Child's Play was first given to me by a professor at the University of Kansas in a summer course on curriculum design. It has nothing to do with curriculum, but certainly tells a dark story of our perception of individuals with disabilities. A reading of this piece will certainly give you something to think about. Look for an bonus essay question on this reading on an exam late in the semester.


Special Education named one of the best professions!

http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2010/12/08/magazine-sped-teacher/11596/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=December+10,+2010:+News+from+Disability+Scoop&utm_source=YMLP&utm_term

Autism/Vaccine Issue

There is a great deal of debate regarding the relationship between vaccinations and the onset of autism. Andrew Wakefield a researcher in the UK is responsible for the paper which posited this link. The paper has been debunked and the journal which originally published the paper has retracted the findings and Wakefield's co-authors have make statement nullifying their work. The following article explores the backlash of this claim.